In our last article, we managed to load and execute a PIE (position-independent executable) compiled from the following code:

X86 Assembly
; in `elk/samples/hello.asm` global _start section .text _start: mov rdi, 1 ; stdout fd mov rsi, msg mov rdx, 9 ; 8 chars + newline mov rax, 1 ; write syscall syscall xor rdi, rdi ; return code 0 mov rax, 60 ; exit syscall syscall msg: db "hi there", 10

The big improvement in that article was that we started caring about relocations.

When we had the following code:

X86 Assembly
_start: mov rdi, 1 ; stdout fd lea rsi, [rel msg]

..it was enough for the code and data segments to be in the right place relative to each other, because it used RIP-relative addressing, like so:

1005: 48 8d 35 f4 1f 00 00 lea rsi,[rip+0x1ff4] # 3000 <path>

But the mov code:

X86 Assembly
_start: mov rdi, 1 ; stdout fd mov rsi, msg

Generated the following machine code, showed with disassembly:

1005: 48 be 00 30 00 00 00 movabs rsi,0x3000 100c: 00 00 00

With the following relocation:

Rela { offset: 00001007, type: Relative, sym: 0, addend: 00003000, }

We've seen that Relative relocations mean to replace the 64-bit integer at offset with the result of base + addend, where addend is specified in the relocation entry itself, and base is the address we chose to load the executable at.

All together now

Well, that's all well and good.

But what if we have two .asm files?

Say, if msg is declared as an extern in hello-dl.asm:

X86 Assembly
; in `elk/samples/hello-dl.asm` global _start extern msg section .text _start: mov rdi, 1 ; stdout fd mov rsi, msg mov rdx, 9 ; 8 chars + newline mov rax, 1 ; write syscall syscall xor rdi, rdi ; return code 0 mov rax, 60 ; exit syscall syscall

And msg itself is defined in another file, say, msg.asm:

X86 Assembly
; in `elk/samples/msg.asm` ; NASM's syntax for exporting global is a bit funky, ; but everything has a purpose. ; here we declare `msg` as a global, and we say it's of type ; `data` (as opposed to `function`). We also have to specify ; its length, which is `end-start`. global msg:data msg.end-msg ; we only have a data section for this file section .data ; `msg` is a label - which makes sense, a label is just a name for ; a place in memory! we've seen the `db` syntax earlier, same here msg: db "hi there", 10 ; this here is a local label - it belongs to `msg` and can be referred ; using `msg.end`. This is how we compute the length of `msg`! .end:

And let's say we compile both of these separately:

Shell session
$ nasm -f elf64 hello-dl.asm $ nasm -f elf64 msg.asm $ file {hello-dl,msg}.o hello-dl.o: ELF 64-bit LSB relocatable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), not stripped msg.o: ELF 64-bit LSB relocatable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), not stripped

And we link them both together - finally giving a real job to our linker:

Shell session
$ ld -pie --dynamic-linker /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 hello-dl.o msg.o -o hello-dl $ file hello-dl hello-dl: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2, not stripped $ ./hello-dl hi there

Then we end up with a fine executable! A perfectly cromulent executable.

Note that if we had forgotten either object file, we would've run into problems.

Without hello-dl.o, we have no entry point:

Shell session
$ ld -pie --dynamic-linker /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 msg.o -o hello-dl ld: warning: cannot find entry symbol _start; not setting start address
Cool bear's hot tip

If you're following along - this still overwrites hello-dl, so you might want to run the right ld invocation aftewards.

Without msg.o, we've got an undefined reference to msg:

Shell session
$ ld -pie --dynamic-linker /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 hello-dl.o -o hello-dl ld: hello-dl.o: in function `_start': hello-dl.asm:(.text+0x7): undefined reference to `msg'

But if we have both, then our executable runs! Does it run through elk?

Shell session
$ # in `elk/` $ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/hello-dl Analyzing "./samples/hello-dl"... File { type: Dyn, machine: X86_64, entry_point: 00001000, program_headers: [ file 00000040..00000200 | mem 00000040..00000200 | align 00000008 | R.. PHdr, file 00000200..0000021a | mem 00000200..0000021a | align 00000001 | R.. Interp, file 00000000..00000288 | mem 00000000..00000288 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00001000..00001025 | mem 00001000..00001025 | align 00001000 | R.X Load, file 00002000..00002000 | mem 00002000..00002000 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00002ee0..00003009 | mem 00002ee0..00003009 | align 00001000 | RW. Load, file 00002ee0..00003000 | mem 00002ee0..00003000 | align 00000008 | RW. Dynamic, file 00002ee0..00003000 | mem 00002ee0..00003000 | align 00000001 | R.. GnuRelRo, ], } Loading with base address @ 0x400000 Mapping 00000000..00000288 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b100, Read) Mapping 00001000..00001025 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b101, Execute | Read) (Applied 1 relocations) Mapping 00002ee0..00003009 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b110, Write | Read) (With 0xee0 bytes of padding at the start) Jumping to entry point @ 00001000... hi there

It does! Well, looks like we all get to go home early today.

Let's call objdump on it real quick:

Shell session
$ # `-d` disassembles code sections (but not data), $ # `-R` shows relocations inline (voluntarily not used last article) $ objdump -dR ./hello-dl ./hello-dl: file format elf64-x86-64 Disassembly of section .text: 0000000000001000 <_start>: 1000: bf 01 00 00 00 mov edi,0x1 1005: 48 be 00 30 00 00 00 movabs rsi,0x3000 100c: 00 00 00 1007: R_X86_64_RELATIVE *ABS*+0x3000 100f: ba 09 00 00 00 mov edx,0x9 1014: b8 01 00 00 00 mov eax,0x1 1019: 0f 05 syscall 101b: 48 31 ff xor rdi,rdi 101e: b8 3c 00 00 00 mov eax,0x3c 1023: 0f 05 syscall

Mh.

That doesn't look any different from the version with only one .asm file.

Very well then - what if we make msg.asm into a dynamic library?

Shell session
$ # this `nasm` invocation is gratuitous - `msg.o` is fine as-is $ nasm -f elf64 msg.asm $ ld -shared msg.o -o libmsg.so $ file libmsg.so libmsg.so: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped

And then link hello-dl.o against it:

Shell session
$ ld -pie --dynamic-linker /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 hello-dl.o libmsg.so -o hello-dl $ file ./hello-dl ./hello-dl: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2, not stripped

Okay, another fine executable. Does it run through elk?

Shell session
$ ../target/debug/elk ./hello-dl Analyzing "./hello-dl"... File { type: Dyn, machine: X86_64, entry_point: 00001000, program_headers: [ file 00000040..00000200 | mem 00000040..00000200 | align 00000008 | R.. PHdr, file 00000200..0000021a | mem 00000200..0000021a | align 00000001 | R.. Interp, file 00000000..000002d0 | mem 00000000..000002d0 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00001000..00001025 | mem 00001000..00001025 | align 00001000 | R.X Load, file 00002000..00002000 | mem 00002000..00002000 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00002ed0..00003000 | mem 00002ed0..00003010 | align 00001000 | RW. Load, file 00002ed0..00003000 | mem 00002ed0..00003000 | align 00000008 | RW. Dynamic, file 00002ed0..00003000 | mem 00002ed0..00003000 | align 00000001 | R.. GnuRelRo, ], } Loading with base address @ 0x400000 Mapping 00000000..000002d0 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b100, Read) Mapping 00001000..00001025 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b101, Execute | Read) Mapping 00002ed0..00003010 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b110, Write | Read) (With 0xed0 bytes of padding at the start) Jumping to entry point @ 00001000...

...not really, no.

But I'm sure it runs on its own - as usual:

Shell session
$ ./hello-dl ./hello-dl: error while loading shared libraries: libmsg.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Ah. Not really, no.

I'm kinda bummed about this error message - libmsg.so is right there.

Shell session
$ file ./libmsg.so ./libmsg.so: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped

Although, to be fair, it didn't say that ./libmsg.so was not found. It said libmsg.so was not found.

And there's a similar thing for executables: running ./hello-pie works fine, because it's the path to a valid file, relative to the current directory. But running hello-pie fails:

Shell session
$ hello-pie zsh: command not found: hello-pie

That is, unless we put the current directory (.) in our $PATH environment variable:

Shell session
$ PATH=".:$PATH" ./hello-pie hi there

Likewise, shared libraries are found using a search path. If we examine ./hello-dl with ldd, which "prints shared object dependencies", according to its man page, we see that it is, indeed, not found:

Shell session
$ ldd ./hello-dl linux-vdso.so.1 (0x00007fffd2ff4000) libmsg.so => not found

However, if we run ldd on elk itself, we see that it depends on a few libraries that are found:

Shell session
$ ldd ../target/debug/elk linux-vdso.so.1 (0x00007ffc56199000) libc.so.6 => /usr/lib/libc.so.6 (0x00007f30fda11000) /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 => /usr/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00007f30fdca7000) libdl.so.2 => /usr/lib/libdl.so.2 (0x00007f30fda0c000) libpthread.so.0 => /usr/lib/libpthread.so.0 (0x00007f30fd9ea000) libgcc_s.so.1 => /usr/lib/libgcc_s.so.1 (0x00007f30fd9d0000)

So, there's definitely default search paths.

And we can print these, by setting $LD_DEBUG=libs and trying to execute ./hello-dl again:

Shell session
$ LD_DEBUG=libs ./hello-dl 758: find library=libmsg.so [0]; searching 758: search cache=/etc/ld.so.cache 758: search path=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/x86_64:/usr/lib/tls/x86_64:/usr/lib/tls/x86_64:/usr/lib/tls:/usr/lib/x86_64/x86_64:/usr/lib/x86_64:/usr/lib/x86_64:/usr/lib (system search path) 758: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/x86_64/libmsg.so 758: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/libmsg.so 758: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/libmsg.so 758: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/libmsg.so 758: trying file=/usr/lib/x86_64/x86_64/libmsg.so 758: trying file=/usr/lib/x86_64/libmsg.so 758: trying file=/usr/lib/x86_64/libmsg.so 758: trying file=/usr/lib/libmsg.so 758: ./hello-dl: error while loading shared libraries: libmsg.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Wait - hello-dl certainly does not care about LD_DEBUG. In fact, we haven't written any code that concerns itself with shared libraries.

We blindly trusted the linker and "the operating system" to do the right thing at link-time and run-time. So where is the code that behaves differently when $LD_DEBUG is set?

Why, it's in the interpreter of course! Which we passed to nasm as the --dynamic-linker argument. It's the .so that is actually an executable, /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2.

Cool bear's hot tip

That's right!

We've been implementing a dynamic linker and we didn't even know it!

But wait, hold on, wait. Who interprets the interpreter? Doesn't /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 itself use some shared libraries? And if so, who finds and loads them for it?

Shell session
$ file ldd /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 statically linked

Ah. It does not use any shared libraries. It's "statically linked".

Very well then, how do we get the dynamic linker to find libmsg.so? Much like $PATH, we can set a library search path by exporting $LD_LIBRARY_PATH.

Shell session
$ LD_LIBRARY_PATH="." ./hello-dl hi there

Great! Although, that's not terribly convenient.

I'd prefer it if our executable could be run without setting up some environment variables. And this is where the RPATH comes in. That's right - an executable can itself contain a library search path, so the final search path is a combination of:

Wonderful. So, how does one set the RPATH of a binary? Well, the tool that generates our final executable is ld, so there's probably an option for it:

Shell session
$ man ld -rpath=dir Add a directory to the runtime library search path. This is used when linking an ELF executable with shared objects. All -rpath arguments are concatenated and passed to the runtime linker, which uses them to locate shared objects at runtime. The -rpath option is also used when locating shared objects which are needed by shared objects explicitly included in the link; see the description of the -rpath-link option. Searching -rpath in this way is only supported by native linkers and cross linkers which have been configured with the --with-sysroot option.

Very well, let's give that a shot:

Shell session
$ # in `elk/samples` - we don't need to regenerate `hello-dl.so` $ ld -rpath . -pie --dynamic-linker /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 hello-dl.o libmsg.so -o hello-dl $ ./hello-dl hi there

Wonderful!

How do we inspect the RPATH for an executable? Well, objdump does it:

Shell session
$ objdump -p ./hello-dl | grep RPATH RPATH .

(It's easy to miss, but there is a dot, ., to the right of RPATH in the output).

Looks good. Now, our executable can be run from anywhere, for example if we run it from elk/ instead of elk/samples, then it still w-

Shell session
$ ./samples/hello-dl ./samples/hello-dl: error while loading shared libraries: libmsg.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

...nevermind. What's happening here? Let's use LD_DEBUG=libs to diagnose, like we learned:

Shell session
LD_DEBUG=libs ./samples/hello-dl 1780: find library=libmsg.so [0]; searching 1780: search path=./tls/x86_64/x86_64:./tls/x86_64:./tls/x86_64:./tls:./x86_64/x86_64:./x86_64:./x86_64:. (RPATH from file ./samples/hello-dl) 1780: trying file=./tls/x86_64/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=./tls/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=./tls/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=./tls/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=./x86_64/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=./x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=./x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=./libmsg.so 1780: search cache=/etc/ld.so.cache 1780: search path=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/x86_64:/usr/lib/tls/x86_64:/usr/lib/tls/x86_64:/usr/lib/tls:/usr/lib/x86_64/x86_64:/usr/lib/x86_64:/usr/lib/x86_64:/usr/lib (system search path) 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/tls/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/x86_64/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/x86_64/libmsg.so 1780: trying file=/usr/lib/libmsg.so 1780: ./samples/hello-dl: error while loading shared libraries: libmsg.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Oh, of course. The . is now referring to elk/, not elk/samples - but the library is in elk/samples/libmsg.so.

Well, maybe there's a way to specify a path relative to the executable itself? That way, if we keep the executable and its library next to each other, in the same folder, then they'll execute fine.

We can do that using the special $ORIGIN token in the value we pass ld's -rpath flag.

Cool bear's hot tip

$ORIGIN in this context is NOT an environment variable.

In fact, we must be especially careful that the shell does not interpret it as an environment variable. We can do that by wrapping in single quotes.

Compare and contrast:

Shell session
$ echo $ORIGIN $ echo "$ORIGIN" $ echo '$ORIGIN' $ORIGIN

Only the single-quote version works properly. We could also escape the dollar sign like so: \$

Let's try it out! It's a token, which means we could use it in a more complex path, like $ORIGIN/libs - but for our purpose, we can go with just $ORIGIN, since our library is right there.

Shell session
$ # in `elk/samples` $ ld -rpath '$ORIGIN' -pie --dynamic-linker /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 hello-dl.o libmsg.so -o hello-dl $ ./hello-dl hi-there $ cd .. $ # now in `elk/` $ ./samples/hello-dl hi there

Great! Everything appears to be working now, no matter what the current working directory is.

It's time to try our new executable through elk.

We don't expect it to run properly, of course. We just learned that elk was half of a broken dynamic linker, and it never loads shared libraries the executable depends on. It doesn't even know about search paths!

But let's go step by step:

Shell session
./target/debug/elk samples/hello-dl Analyzing "samples/hello-dl"... File { type: Dyn, machine: X86_64, entry_point: 00001000, program_headers: [ file 00000040..00000200 | mem 00000040..00000200 | align 00000008 | R.. PHdr, file 00000200..0000021a | mem 00000200..0000021a | align 00000001 | R.. Interp, file 00000000..000002d8 | mem 00000000..000002d8 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00001000..00001025 | mem 00001000..00001025 | align 00001000 | R.X Load, file 00002000..00002000 | mem 00002000..00002000 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00002ec0..00003000 | mem 00002ec0..00003010 | align 00001000 | RW. Load, file 00002ec0..00003000 | mem 00002ec0..00003000 | align 00000008 | RW. Dynamic, file 00002ec0..00003000 | mem 00002ec0..00003000 | align 00000001 | R.. GnuRelRo, ], } Loading with base address @ 0x400000 Mapping 00000000..000002d8 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b100, Read) Mapping 00001000..00001025 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b101, Execute | Read) Mapping 00002ec0..00003010 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b110, Write | Read) (With 0xec0 bytes of padding at the start) Jumping to entry point @ 00001000...

Yeah. As expected, it doesn't print "hi there". I'm surprised it doesn't crash!

Let's try stepping through it with ugdb:

Shell session
$ ugdb ./target/debug/elk ./samples/hello-dl (gdb) break jmp (gdb) start

Ah. We can see our mov rsi, msg (where msg was an extern) turned into a movabs again. And, right now, the source operand is the immediate 0x0.

Maybe we missed a relocation?

Let's review our code. Here's our RelType enum:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Debug, TryFromPrimitive, Clone, Copy, PartialEq, Eq)] #[repr(u32)] pub enum RelType { GlobDat = 6, JumpSlot = 7, Relative = 8, } impl_parse_for_enum!(RelType, le_u32);

And here's the delf::File::read_rela_entries method:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` impl File { pub fn read_rela_entries(&self) -> Result<Vec<Rela>, ReadRelaError> { use DynamicTag as DT; use ReadRelaError as E; let addr = self.dynamic_entry(DT::Rela).ok_or(E::RelaNotFound)?; let len = self.dynamic_entry(DT::RelaSz).ok_or(E::RelaSzNotFound)?; let seg = self.segment_at(addr).ok_or(E::RelaSegmentNotFound)?; let i = &seg.data[(addr - seg.mem_range().start).into()..][..len.into()]; use nom::multi::many0; match many0(Rela::parse)(i) { Ok((_, rela_entries)) => Ok(rela_entries), Err(nom::Err::Failure(err)) | Err(nom::Err::Error(err)) => { let e = &err.errors[0]; let (_input, error_kind) = e; return Err(E::ParsingError(error_kind.clone())); } // we don't use any "streaming" parsers, so. _ => unreachable!(), } } }

Mhh. We're using many0.. and we only recognize some relocation types.. which means if we encounter an unknown relocation type... we'll just silently miss it!

Right now, we should have zero relocations, let's check by printing them from elk:

Rust code
// in `elk/src/main.rs` let rela_entries = file.read_rela_entries().unwrap_or_else(|e| { println!("Could not read relocations: {:?}", e); Default::default() }); println!("Found {} rela entries", rela_entries.len()); for entry in rela_entries.iter() { println!("{:?}", entry); }
Shell session
$ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk samples/hello-dl Analyzing "samples/hello-dl"... (cut) Found 0 rela entries

Right.

The thing is, there's a dynamic section entry for the "total size" of the rela table, and there's a dynamic section entry for the "entry size" of the rela table, so, with a little division, we should be able to compute the number of expected relocations! And then we can use nom::multi::many_m_n to parse Rela the expected number of times, or error out.

Let's try this.

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Error, Debug)] pub enum ReadRelaError { #[error("Rela dynamic entry not found")] RelaNotFound, #[error("RelaEnt dynamic entry not found")] RelaEntNotFound, #[error("RelaSz dynamic entry not found")] RelaSzNotFound, // omitted: other variants } impl File { pub fn read_rela_entries(&self) -> Result<Vec<Rela>, ReadRelaError> { use DynamicTag as DT; use ReadRelaError as E; let addr = self.dynamic_entry(DT::Rela).ok_or(E::RelaNotFound)?; let len = self.dynamic_entry(DT::RelaSz).ok_or(E::RelaSzNotFound)?; let ent = self.dynamic_entry(DT::RelaEnt).ok_or(E::RelaEntNotFound)?; let seg = self.segment_at(addr).ok_or(E::RelaSegNotFound)?; let i = &seg.data[(addr - seg.mem_range().start).into()..][..len.into()]; let n = (len.0 / ent.0) as usize; use nom::multi::many_m_n; match many_m_n(n, n, Rela::parse)(i) { // omitted } } }

Good. We haven't added support for any new relocation types, but at least if we encounter an unknown one, it should error out.

Shell session
$ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk samples/hello-dl ./target/debug/elk samples/hello-dl Analyzing "samples/hello-dl"... (cut) Could not read relocations: ParsingError(Nom(MapRes)) Found 0 rela entries

Well. This doesn't exactly show us which relocations we missed.

In fact, our error reporting code is really lacking, as it only shows one nom::error::VerboseErrorKind. Since we're probably encountering a non-existent variant of the Rela enum, I'm ready to bet that there's an Alt error kind we've just swallowed.

But even if we printed everything, we wouldn't really see the relocation type printed out nicely. Sure, if we printed a hex dump of the input at the time the parser failed, we would be able to look at hexadecimal bytes and figure out which u32 value it should be.

Or, or we could parse unknown relocation types and decide what to do with those later.

If we just add it to the RelType enum declaration, we're going to run into problems:

#[derive(Debug, TryFromPrimitive, Clone, Copy, PartialEq, Eq)] #[repr(u32)] pub enum RelType { GlobDat = 6, JumpSlot = 7, Relative = 8, Unknown(u32), } impl_parse_for_enum!(RelType, le_u32);
Shell session
$ cargo b -q cargo b -q error[E0658]: custom discriminant values are not allowed in enums with tuple or struct variants --> /home/amos/ftl/delf/src/lib.rs:131:15 | 131 | GlobDat = 6, | ^ disallowed custom discriminant 132 | JumpSlot = 7, | ^ disallowed custom discriminant 133 | Relative = 8, | ^ disallowed custom discriminant 134 | Unknown(u32), | ------------ tuple variant defined here | = note: for more information, see https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/issues/60553

..and that's just the first error.

That makes sense though. RelType is repr(u32) - there's no room in there to store tuple variants like Unknown(u32). The following error is related to DeriveTryFromPrimitive, which doesn't know how in the world to try and convert a u32 to a tuple variant.

We can sidestep this problem with an additional enum. It'll make our code more verbose, but there won't be any runtime cost for it, so, let's go:

Rust code
#[derive(Debug, TryFromPrimitive, Clone, Copy, PartialEq, Eq)] #[repr(u32)] pub enum KnownRelType { GlobDat = 6, JumpSlot = 7, Relative = 8, } impl_parse_for_enum!(KnownRelType, le_u32); #[derive(Debug, Clone, Copy, PartialEq, Eq)] pub enum RelType { Known(KnownRelType), Unknown(u32), }

Good! Now it's either known, or unknown. We're handling all the cases. The type checker would be proud of us.

The last little wrinkle, of course, is that only KnownRelType::parse exists. The new RelType doesn't have a parse method, so, let's get to it:

Rust code
impl RelType { pub fn parse(i: parse::Input) -> parse::Result<Self> { use nom::{branch::alt, combinator::map, number::complete::le_u32}; // `alt` tries several parsers one by one, until one succeeds alt(( map(KnownRelType::parse, Self::Known), map(le_u32, Self::Unknown), ))(i) } }

Fantastic!

Now, is RelType / KnownRelType the best way to model ELF relocation types for our purposes? Probably not.

Is it a great way to learn about nom::branch::alt? Yeah!

Let's try it out:

Shell session
$ # in `elk/` $ cargo b -q error[E0599]: no variant or associated item named `Relative` found for type `delf::RelType` in the current scope --> src/main.rs:69:40 | 69 | delf::RelType::Relative => { | ^^^^^^^^ variant or associated item not found in `delf::RelType` error: aborting due to previous error For more information about this error, try `rustc --explain E0599`. error: could not compile `elk`. To learn more, run the command again with --verbose.

Oh, right, I almost forgot. We match against RelType from elk directly. Because we end up applying known relocations. It's nothing a bit of pattern matching can't solve:

Rust code
// in `elk/src/main.rs` // in `main` let mut num_relocs = 0; for reloc in &rela_entries { if mem_range.contains(&reloc.offset) { unsafe { // omitted match reloc.r#type { delf::RelType::Known(t) => { num_relocs += 1; match t { delf::KnownRelType::Relative => { // omitted } t => { panic!("Unsupported relocation type {:?}", t); } } } delf::RelType::Unknown(_) => { // ignore unknown relocation types } } } } }
Shell session
$ cargo b -q ./target/debug/elk samples/hello-dl Analyzing "samples/hello-dl"... (omitted) Found 2 rela entries Rela { offset: 00001007, type: Unknown(1), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } Rela { offset: 00003000, type: Unknown(5), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 }

Nice! Two unknown relocation entry types: 1 and 5.

According to our table in the last article:

Very well, let's add those:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Debug, TryFromPrimitive, Clone, Copy, PartialEq, Eq)] #[repr(u32)] pub enum KnownRelType { // new! _64 = 1, // new! Copy = 5, GlobDat = 6, JumpSlot = 7, Relative = 8, } impl_parse_for_enum!(KnownRelType, le_u32);

Note that we had to prefix 64 with an underscore, otherwise it's not a valid identifier.

Shell session
$ cargo b -q (cut) Found 2 rela entries Rela { offset: 00001007, type: Known(_64), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } Rela { offset: 00003000, type: Known(Copy), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } Loading with base address @ 0x400000 Mapping 00000000..000002d8 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b100, Read) Mapping 00001000..00001025 - BitFlags<SegmentFlag>(0b101, Execute | Read) thread 'main' panicked at 'Unsupported relocation type _64', src/main.rs:79:37 note: run with `RUST_BACKTRACE=1` environment variable to display a backtrace.

Good!

Now there's the small matter of.. us not yet knowing what 64 and Copy relocations do, at all. But we can sorta guess.

The 64 relocation is at offset 0x1007, which definitely sounds like an offset we've heard before.

Shell session
$ # note: the '^' were added $ objdump -d ./samples/hello-dl ./samples/hello-dl: file format elf64-x86-64 Disassembly of section .text: 0000000000001000 <_start>: 1000: bf 01 00 00 00 mov edi,0x1 1005: 48 be 00 00 00 00 00 movabs rsi,0x0 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 100c: 00 00 00 ^^^^^^^^ (cut)

Ah, yes! That seems like exactly the same thing. This time the addend is 0x0, though. But the sym field is no longer 0 - it's 1! Could it possibly refer to the msg symbol?

Then there's the copy relocation. It's at offset 0x3000, which.. doesn't.. exist in the file?

As a reminder, our "Load" program headers are as follow:

file 00000000..000002d8 | mem 00000000..000002d8 | align 00001000 | R.. Load file 00001000..00001025 | mem 00001000..00001025 | align 00001000 | R.X Load file 00002000..00002000 | mem 00002000..00002000 | align 00001000 | R.. Load file 00002ec0..00003000 | mem 00002ec0..00003010 | align 00001000 | RW. Load

Oh hey! That last read+write segment goes to 0x3000 in the file, but it goes to 0x3010 in memory! That means we've got an additional 16 bytes in memory. Which is definitely enough to store msg.

Let's test our hypothesis - what would happen if msg was longer than 16 bytes?

X86 Assembly
; in `elk/samples/msg.asm` global msg:data msg.end-msg section .data msg: db "this is way longer than sixteen bytes", 10 .end:

We now have 38 bytes in there. We mustn't forget to change the count argument to the write syscall in hello-dl, otherwise we won't get the full output.

X86 Assembly
; in `elk/samples/hello-dl.asm` global _start extern msg section .text _start: mov rdi, 1 ; stdout fd mov rsi, msg ; new! mov rdx, 38 ; 37 chars + newline mov rax, 1 ; write syscall syscall xor rdi, rdi ; return code 0 mov rax, 60 ; exit syscall syscall

Now we have to recompile and link all of this:

Shell session
$ nasm -f elf64 msg.asm $ ld -shared msg.o -o libmsg.so $ nasm -f elf64 hello-dl.asm $ ld -rpath '$ORIGIN' -pie --dynamic-linker /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 hello-dl.o libmsg.so -o hello-dl $ ./hello-dl this is way longer than sixteen bytes

Alright, still works - so far so good.

What does elk say?

Shell session
$ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/hello-dl Analyzing "./samples/hello-dl"... File { type: Dyn, machine: X86_64, entry_point: 00001000, program_headers: [ file 00000040..00000200 | mem 00000040..00000200 | align 00000008 | R.. PHdr, file 00000200..0000021a | mem 00000200..0000021a | align 00000001 | R.. Interp, file 00000000..000002d8 | mem 00000000..000002d8 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00001000..00001025 | mem 00001000..00001025 | align 00001000 | R.X Load, file 00002000..00002000 | mem 00002000..00002000 | align 00001000 | R.. Load, file 00002ec0..00003000 | mem 00002ec0..00003028 | align 00001000 | RW. Load, file 00002ec0..00003000 | mem 00002ec0..00003000 | align 00000008 | RW. Dynamic, file 00002ec0..00003000 | mem 00002ec0..00003000 | align 00000001 | R.. GnuRelRo, ], } Found 2 rela entries Rela { offset: 00001007, type: Known(_64), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } Rela { offset: 00003000, type: Known(Copy), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } (cut)

AhAH! Now it goes all the way to 0x3028.

Let's run hello-dl in ugdb to make sure we know what exactly is being mov'd into rsi.

Shell session
$ ugdb ./samples/hello-dl (gdb) break _start (gdb) start

Okay, it's moving 0x555555557000 - but what is currently mapped there?

Shell session
$ cat /proc/12142/maps 555555554000-555555556000 r-xp 00000000 08:01 3293905 /home/amos/ftl/elk/samples/hello-dl 555555556000-555555557000 r-xp 00002000 08:01 3293905 /home/amos/ftl/elk/samples/hello-dl 555555557000-555555558000 rwxp 00000000 00:00 0 [heap] 7ffff7fc9000-7ffff7fca000 r-xp 00000000 08:01 3293934 /home/amos/ftl/elk/samples/libmsg.so 7ffff7fca000-7ffff7fcb000 r-xp 00001000 08:01 3293934 /home/amos/ftl/elk/samples/libmsg.so 7ffff7fcb000-7ffff7fcc000 rwxp 00002000 08:01 3293934 /home/amos/ftl/elk/samples/libmsg.so 7ffff7fcc000-7ffff7fce000 rwxp 00000000 00:00 0 7ffff7fce000-7ffff7fd1000 r--p 00000000 00:00 0 [vvar] 7ffff7fd1000-7ffff7fd2000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0 [vdso] 7ffff7fd2000-7ffff7ffb000 r-xp 00000000 08:01 795305 /usr/lib/ld-2.30.so 7ffff7ffc000-7ffff7ffe000 rwxp 00029000 08:01 795305 /usr/lib/ld-2.30.so 7ffff7ffe000-7ffff7fff000 rwxp 00000000 00:00 0 7ffffffde000-7ffffffff000 rwxp 00000000 00:00 0 [stack] ffffffffff600000-ffffffffff601000 --xp 00000000 00:00 0 [vsyscall]

Well, certainly not libmsg.so!

The corresponding line seems to be:

555555557000-555555558000 rwxp 00000000 00:00 0 [heap]

Which is annotated with [heap].

Maybe that's what the Copy relocation is about? Maybe it copies data from another shared object into the executable's memory?

After all, 0x555555557000 - 0x555555554000, that is, the distance between the beginning of the [heap] segment and the beginning of the code segment, is 0x3000. And that's the offset we got in the relocation, remember?

Found 2 rela entries Rela { offset: 00001007, type: Known(_64), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } Rela { offset: 00003000, type: Known(Copy), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } ^^^^^^^^

It seems our job is pretty clear. When running hello-dl, we must:

Mh. Wait. We skipped a few steps.

How do we know to load libmsg.so in the first place? How do we know it's msg we should copy? Even if we did know, how do we find it in libmsg.so?

Also, don't we have two msg in memory now? Once mapped directly from libmsg.so, and the second, copied into one of hello-dl's segments. When copying, how do we know which one is the source, and which one is the destination?

Let's think. Loading a shared library sounds like a "dynamic" operation - as in, it's done at runtime, as the executable itself is being loaded. We have a dynamic section - let's review the dynamic tags we have available.

Rust code
// in `elk/src/main.rs` // in `main()` println!("Found {} rela entries", rela_entries.len()); for entry in rela_entries.iter() { println!("{:?}", entry); } if let Some(dynseg) = file.segment_of_type(delf::SegmentType::Dynamic) { if let delf::SegmentContents::Dynamic(ref dyntab) = dynseg.contents { println!("Dynamic table entries:"); for e in dyntab { println!("{:?}", e); } } }
Shell session
$ # in `elk/` $ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/hello-dl (cut) Dynamic table entries: DynamicEntry { tag: Needed, addr: 00000001 } DynamicEntry { tag: RPath, addr: 0000000f } DynamicEntry { tag: Hash, addr: 00000220 } DynamicEntry { tag: GnuHash, addr: 00000238 } DynamicEntry { tag: StrTab, addr: 00000290 } DynamicEntry { tag: SymTab, addr: 00000260 } DynamicEntry { tag: StrSz, addr: 00000017 } DynamicEntry { tag: SymEnt, addr: 00000018 } DynamicEntry { tag: Debug, addr: 00000000 } DynamicEntry { tag: Rela, addr: 000002a8 } DynamicEntry { tag: RelaSz, addr: 00000030 } DynamicEntry { tag: RelaEnt, addr: 00000018 } DynamicEntry { tag: TextRel, addr: 00000000 } DynamicEntry { tag: Flags1, addr: 08000000 } (cut)

Interesting! We've got RPath, which certainly seems like it's there because we passed --rpath to ld, the linker. We've also got Needed, which we didn't have before.

They're both numbers or addresses though. How does one reference strings in the dynamic table where we can only store numbers or addresses? By giving an offset into a string table!

And that's what StrTab is all about. Our ELF-64 reference says it's the "address of the dynamic string table". The address given is 0x290, let's see what's in there using dd and xxd:

Shell session
$ dd status=none if=./samples/hello-dl skip=$((0x290)) bs=1 count=30 | xxd 00000000: 006c 6962 6d73 672e 736f 006d 7367 0024 .libmsg.so.msg.$ 00000010: 4f52 4947 494e 0000 0710 0000 0000 ORIGIN........

Well well well. This looks like a bunch of null-terminated strings! The first one, at 0x1 into the string table, is the name of one of the libraries we need. The second one is the name of a symbol, but we haven't seen a reference to it yet. The third one, at 0xf into the string table, is our RPATH!

It's time... for more abstraction.

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Error, Debug)] pub enum GetStringError { #[error("StrTab dynamic entry not found")] StrTabNotFound, #[error("StrTab segment not found")] StrTabSegmentNotFound, #[error("String not found")] StringNotFound, } impl File { /** * Returns a slice containing the contents of the relevant Load segment * starting at `mem_addr` until the end of that segment, or None if * no suitable segment can be found. */ pub fn slice_at(&self, mem_addr: Addr) -> Option<&[u8]> { self.segment_at(mem_addr) .map(|seg| &seg.data[(mem_addr - seg.mem_range().start).into()..]) } pub fn get_string(&self, offset: Addr) -> Result<String, GetStringError> { use DynamicTag as DT; use GetStringError as E; let addr = self.dynamic_entry(DT::StrTab).ok_or(E::StrTabNotFound)?; let slice = self .slice_at(addr + offset) .ok_or(E::StrTabSegmentNotFound)?; // Our strings are null-terminated, so we (lazily) split the slice into // slices separated by '\0' and take the first item let string_slice = slice.split(|&c| c == 0).next().ok_or(E::StringNotFound)?; Ok(String::from_utf8_lossy(string_slice).into()) } }

Now that I think of it, slice_at would come in handy for read_rela_entries as well, so, let's try that! We had:

Rust code
impl File { pub fn read_rela_entries(&self) -> Result<Vec<Rela>, ReadRelaError> { // (cut) // before: let seg = self.segment_at(addr).ok_or(E::RelaSegmentNotFound)?; let i = &seg.data[(addr - seg.mem_range().start).into()..][..len.into()]; // after: let i = self.slice_at(addr).ok_or(E::RelaSegmentNotFound)?; let i = &i[..len.into()]; // (this can be written as a one-liner, but it's more readable that way imho) // (cut) } }

Now, with our newfound powers, we can print strings for Needed and Rpath entries, from elk:

Rust code
// in `elk/src/main.rs` // in `main()` if let Some(dynseg) = file.segment_of_type(delf::SegmentType::Dynamic) { if let delf::SegmentContents::Dynamic(ref dyntab) = dynseg.contents { println!("Dynamic table entries:"); for e in dyntab { println!("{:?}", e); match e.tag { delf::DynamicTag::Needed | delf::DynamicTag::RPath => { println!(" => {:?}", file.get_string(e.addr)?); } _ => {} } } } }
Shell session
$ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/hello-dl Dynamic table entries: DynamicEntry { tag: Needed, addr: 00000001 } => "libmsg.so" DynamicEntry { tag: RPath, addr: 0000000f } => "$ORIGIN"

So.

We have a lot of work to do. But first... some helpers. It's kinda annoying to have to pattern match to find dynamic table entries - we're going to need to do that a lot, so, maybe we should just have a way to get the whole dynamic table, and an iterator of entries with a given dynamic tag.

We already have dynamic_entry, like so:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` impl File { pub fn dynamic_entry(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> Option<Addr> { match self.segment_of_type(SegmentType::Dynamic) { Some(ProgramHeader { contents: SegmentContents::Dynamic(entries), .. }) => entries.iter().find(|e| e.tag == tag).map(|e| e.addr), _ => None, } } }

So let's rejiggle it a little:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` impl File { // (cut) pub fn dynamic_table(&self) -> Option<&[DynamicEntry]> { match self.segment_of_type(SegmentType::Dynamic) { Some(ProgramHeader { contents: SegmentContents::Dynamic(entries), .. }) => Some(entries), _ => None, } } pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> { self.dynamic_table() .unwrap_or_default() .iter() .filter(|e| e.tag == tag) .map(|e| e.addr) } pub fn dynamic_entry(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> Option<Addr> { self.dynamic_entries(tag).next() } }

Now, this code is very close to working. We get the following error:

Shell session
$ cargo b -q error: cannot infer an appropriate lifetime --> src/lib.rs:381:14 | 380 | pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> { | -------------------------- this return type evaluates to the `'static` lifetime... 381 | self.dynamic_table() | ---- ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ | | | ...but this borrow... | note: ...can't outlive the anonymous lifetime #1 defined on the method body at 380:5 --> src/lib.rs:380:5 | 380 | / pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> { 381 | | self.dynamic_table() 382 | | .unwrap_or_default() 383 | | .iter() 384 | | .filter(|e| e.tag == tag) 385 | | .map(|e| e.addr) 386 | | } | |_____^ help: you can add a constraint to the return type to make it last less than `'static` and match the anonymous lifetime #1 defined on the method body at 380:5 | 380 | pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> + '_ { | ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

This is a problem I've discussed before, in the article Recursive iterators in Rust.

Even though we're returning an Iterator of Addrs, we must hold on to a valid reference to self.dynamic_table() (and by extension, self) while we enumerate.

My fix was going to be this:

Rust code
// there's three 'a in our first line of code: // 'a is declared as a lifetime type parameter, &self is bound to it, and so is our return type. pub fn dynamic_entries<'a>(&'a self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> + 'a { self.dynamic_table() .unwrap_or_default() .iter() .filter(|e| e.tag == tag) .map(|e| e.addr) }

...which I thought was nice, because it clearly shows how we're giving our return type (the Iterator) the same lifetime as the reference to self.

But it turns out the compiler's suggestion works just as well, because &self already has an anonymous lifetime, '_, which is less than 'static. You can read more about it in the Rust 2018 edition guide's chapter on the anonymous lifetime.

Rust code
// 'a is all gone, we just have a single `+ '_`, as suggested pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> + '_ { self.dynamic_table() .unwrap_or_default() .iter() .filter(|e| e.tag == tag) .map(|e| e.addr) }

With that fixed, we've got another error to fix:

Shell session
$ cargo b -q error[E0373]: closure may outlive the current function, but it borrows `tag`, which is owned by the current function --> src/lib.rs:384:21 | 384 | .filter(|e| e.tag == tag) | ^^^ --- `tag` is borrowed here | | | may outlive borrowed value `tag` | note: closure is returned here --> src/lib.rs:381:9 | 381 | / self.dynamic_table() 382 | | .unwrap_or_default() 383 | | .iter() 384 | | .filter(|e| e.tag == tag) 385 | | .map(|e| e.addr) | |____________________________^ help: to force the closure to take ownership of `tag` (and any other referenced variables), use the `move` keyword | 384 | .filter(move |e| e.tag == tag) | ^^^^^^^^

Same problem, different message. tag, an argument to dynamic_entries, is currently borrowed, because as it turns out, we forgot to derive Clone and Copy on it. And for non-Copy types, the default behavior for closures is to borrow.

Cool bear's hot tip

Note that you can't derive Copy without Clone.

We could derive those traits right now - DynamicTag is just a simple enum, or we could apply the compiler's suggestion again, which is spot-on.

Rust code
pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> + '_ { self.dynamic_table() .unwrap_or_default() .iter() .filter(move |e| e.tag == tag) .map(|e| e.addr) }

That's it for this exercise. However, I really do want DynamicTag to be Clone + Copy, so let's address that now:

Rust code
#[derive(Debug, TryFromPrimitive, PartialEq, Eq, Clone, Copy)] #[repr(u64)] pub enum DynamicTag { Null = 0, Needed = 1, // etc. }

And since I know some are going to ask, yes, yes indeed, we can use filter_map here to replace filter + map, here goes:

Rust code
pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, filter_tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> + '_ { self.dynamic_table() .unwrap_or_default() .iter() .filter_map(move |e| match e { &DynamicEntry { addr, tag } if tag == filter_tag => Some(addr), _ => None, }) }

As you can see, it's actually less readable, and I'm unconvinced there's any other benefit to it, so now that we've established that it existed, let's go back to the readable version:

Rust code
pub fn dynamic_entries(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = Addr> + '_ { self.dynamic_table() .unwrap_or_default() .iter() .filter(move |e| e.tag == tag) .map(|e| e.addr) }

For extra convenience, let's add another helper, that returns some dynamic entries as strings. This time, filter_map is a better fit!

Rust code
pub fn dynamic_entry_strings(&self, tag: DynamicTag) -> impl Iterator<Item = String> + '_ { self.dynamic_entries(tag) .filter_map(move |addr| self.get_string(addr).ok()) // `Result::ok` transforms a `Result<T, E>` into an `Option<T>` // effectively ignoring the error. // This will silently ignore strings we're not able to retrieve, // but that is a sacrifice I'm willing to make. }

Now then.

The last missing piece, I think, is figuring out how to resolve a symbol.

First of all, what is this Rela's sym field referring to?

Rela { offset: 00001007, type: Known(_64), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 }

I remember seeing a SymTab dynamic tag earlier on. Our ELF-64 reference says it's the "address of the dynamic symbol table". Of course. We know the drill by now.

As a C struct, it looks like this:

C code
typedef struct { Elf64_Word st_name; /* Symbol name */ unsigned char st_info; /* Type and Binding attributes */ unsigned char st_other; /* Reserved */ Elf64_Half st_shndx; /* Section table index */ Elf64_Addr st_value; /* Symbol value */ Elf64_Xword st_size; /* Size of object (e.g., common) */ } Elf64_Sym;

st_name is an offset into the string table (we got that covered). st_info contains two 4-bit values: the binding attributes (local, global, weak, etc.) and the symbol type (notype, object, func, section, file, etc.)

st_shndx lets us know in which section the symbol is defined, and has special values like SHN_ABS (for "numbers") and SHN_UNDEF (for "undefined symbols"). st_value is the address of the symbol - for defined symbols, it corresponds to virtual memory, ie. where it's mapped once the executable is loaded (adjusted for base address).

Finally, st_size is the size of the symbol: for variables, it's the size of the variable - 38 for our msg variable. For functions it's the total size of all its instructions!

This is all pretty standard parsing, except for st_info, which we're going to have to split into two. We've already parsed numbers smaller than bytes using nom::bits::bits and the ux crate.

This time, we'll only use the former.

Since we're going to have to convert between bit-level errors and byte-level errors, we'll need to add a few types to parse.rs:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/parse.rs` // omitted: `impl_parse*` macros #[derive(Debug, Clone)] pub enum ErrorKind { Nom(nom::error::ErrorKind), Context(&'static str), } pub struct Error<I> { pub errors: Vec<(I, ErrorKind)>, } impl<I> nom::error::ParseError<I> for Error<I> { fn from_error_kind(input: I, kind: nom::error::ErrorKind) -> Self { let errors = vec![(input, ErrorKind::Nom(kind))]; Self { errors } } fn append(input: I, kind: nom::error::ErrorKind, mut other: Self) -> Self { other.errors.push((input, ErrorKind::Nom(kind))); other } fn add_context(input: I, ctx: &'static str, mut other: Self) -> Self { other.errors.push((input, ErrorKind::Context(ctx))); other } } pub type Input<'a> = &'a [u8]; pub type Result<'a, O> = nom::IResult<Input<'a>, O, Error<Input<'a>>>; pub type BitInput<'a> = (&'a [u8], usize); pub type BitResult<'a, O> = nom::IResult<BitInput<'a>, O, Error<BitInput<'a>>>; use nom::{ErrorConvert, Slice}; use std::ops::RangeFrom; impl<I> ErrorConvert<Error<I>> for Error<(I, usize)> where I: Slice<RangeFrom<usize>>, { fn convert(self) -> Error<I> { let errors = self .errors .into_iter() .map(|((rest, offset), err)| (rest.slice(offset / 8..), err)) .collect(); Error { errors } } }

We also need to fix up our ReadRelaError enum, which referred to nom::error::VerboseKind by name:

Rust code
#[derive(Error, Debug)] pub enum ReadRelaError { // (omitted: other variants) #[error("Parsing error")] ParsingError(parse::ErrorKind), }

Back to our symbols: we'll start with the two four-bit values, SymBind and SymType:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Debug, TryFromPrimitive, Clone, Copy)] #[repr(u8)] pub enum SymBind { Local = 0, Global = 1, Weak = 2, } #[derive(Debug, TryFromPrimitive, Clone, Copy)] #[repr(u8)] pub enum SymType { None = 0, Object = 1, Func = 2, Section = 3, }

We're no doubt going to run into some unknown symbol bindings and types, but what we have there should be enough to get up and running, so the actual fields in the Sym struct (yet to be defined) will be Option<SymBind> and Option<SymType> - and that's exactly what their parsers will return:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` impl SymBind { pub fn parse(i: parse::BitInput) -> parse::BitResult<Option<Self>> { use nom::{bits::complete::take, combinator::map}; map(take(4_usize), Self::try_from)(i) } } impl SymType { pub fn parse(i: parse::BitInput) -> parse::BitResult<Option<Self>> { use nom::{bits::complete::take, combinator::map}; map(take(4_usize), Self::try_from)(i) } }

They're so similar, we could be tempted to use macros or something.. but, two is less than three, so we'll resist the urge.

The next slightly-peculiar field is shndx. Sure it's, a 16-bit unsigned integer (that's what Elf64_Half is), but it also has special values, so maybe we should define a wrapper type.

Rust code
// `src/delf/lib.rs` #[derive(Clone, Copy)] pub struct SectionIndex(pub u16); impl SectionIndex { pub fn is_undef(&self) -> bool { self.0 == 0 } pub fn is_special(&self) -> bool { self.0 >= 0xff00 } pub fn get(&self) -> Option<usize> { if self.is_undef() || self.is_special() { None } else { Some(self.0 as usize) } } } impl fmt::Debug for SectionIndex { fn fmt(&self, f: &mut fmt::Formatter) -> fmt::Result { if self.is_special() { write!(f, "Special({:04x})", self.0) } else if self.is_undef() { write!(f, "Undef") } else { write!(f, "{}", self.0) } } }

Is this overkill? Almost definitely. But it's also extremely on-brand.

We're all set up to define Sym, along with its parser:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Debug)] pub struct Sym { pub name: Addr, pub bind: Option<SymBind>, pub r#type: Option<SymType>, pub shndx: SectionIndex, pub value: Addr, pub size: u64, } impl Sym { pub fn parse(i: parse::Input) -> parse::Result<Self> { use nom::{ bits::bits, combinator::map, number::complete::{le_u16, le_u32, le_u64, le_u8}, sequence::tuple, }; let (i, (name, (bind, r#type), _reserved, shndx, value, size)) = tuple(( map(le_u32, |x| Addr(x as u64)), bits(tuple((SymBind::parse, SymType::parse))), le_u8, map(le_u16, SectionIndex), Addr::parse, le_u64, ))(i)?; let res = Self { name, bind, r#type, shndx, value, size, }; Ok((i, res)) } }

Finally, we need a method on delf::File, similar to read_rela_entries, but for the symbol table.

There's one small problem, though. We don't know how many entries there are in the symbol table.

If we dump all the dynamic tags there are in samples/hello-dl:

DynamicEntry { tag: Needed, addr: 00000001 } DynamicEntry { tag: RPath, addr: 0000000f } DynamicEntry { tag: Hash, addr: 00000220 } DynamicEntry { tag: GnuHash, addr: 00000238 } DynamicEntry { tag: StrTab, addr: 00000290 } DynamicEntry { tag: SymTab, addr: 00000260 } ^^^^^^ DynamicEntry { tag: StrSz, addr: 00000017 } DynamicEntry { tag: SymEnt, addr: 00000018 } ^^^^^^ DynamicEntry { tag: Debug, addr: 00000000 } DynamicEntry { tag: Rela, addr: 000002a8 } DynamicEntry { tag: RelaSz, addr: 00000030 } DynamicEntry { tag: RelaEnt, addr: 00000018 } DynamicEntry { tag: TextRel, addr: 00000000 } DynamicEntry { tag: Flags1, addr: 08000000 }

We see that we have SymTab (where it is) and SymEnt (how long an entry is), but no SymSz or SymCount.

So far we've been sticking exclusively with "program headers", which give us the "execution view" of the ELF file. But now that we're resolving symbols, we're.. performing dynamic linking. Here, we need help from the "linking view", which the "section headers" give us.

My bet is that the offset given us to by the SymTab dynamic entry corresponds to one of the sections described by a section header.

This article is getting fairly long, so, let's be quick:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Debug)] pub struct SectionHeader { pub name: Addr, pub r#type: u32, pub flags: u64, pub addr: Addr, pub off: Addr, pub size: Addr, pub link: u32, pub info: u32, pub addralign: Addr, pub entsize: Addr, } impl SectionHeader { pub fn parse(i: parse::Input) -> parse::Result<Self> { use nom::{ combinator::map, number::complete::{le_u32, le_u64}, sequence::tuple, }; let (i, (name, r#type, flags, addr, off, size, link, info, addralign, entsize)) = tuple(( map(le_u32, |x| Addr(x as u64)), le_u32, le_u64, Addr::parse, Addr::parse, Addr::parse, le_u32, le_u32, Addr::parse, Addr::parse, ))(i)?; let res = Self { name, r#type, flags, addr, off, size, link, info, addralign, entsize, }; Ok((i, res)) } }

Nothing special here. We store name as an Addr because it's an offset into StrTab, even though it's stored as an u32 in the file, presumably for space-saving reasons.

Next up, adding a field to delf::File:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Debug)] pub struct File { pub r#type: Type, pub machine: Machine, pub entry_point: Addr, pub program_headers: Vec<ProgramHeader>, pub section_headers: Vec<SectionHeader>, }

And adjusting its parser:

Rust code
impl File { const MAGIC: &'static [u8] = &[0x7f, 0x45, 0x4c, 0x46]; #[allow(unused_variables)] pub fn parse(i: parse::Input) -> parse::Result<Self> { let full_input = i; // omitted: ELF header parsing // same as before let ph_slices = (&full_input[ph_offset.into()..]).chunks(ph_entsize); let mut program_headers = Vec::new(); for ph_slice in ph_slices.take(ph_count) { let (_, ph) = ProgramHeader::parse(full_input, ph_slice)?; program_headers.push(ph); } // and, similarly, for section headers let sh_slices = (&full_input[sh_offset.into()..]).chunks(sh_entsize); let mut section_headers = Vec::new(); for sh_slice in sh_slices.take(sh_count) { let (_, sh) = SectionHeader::parse(sh_slice)?; section_headers.push(sh); } let res = Self { machine, r#type, entry_point, program_headers, section_headers, }; Ok((i, res)) } }

Let's dump our newly-read section headers from elk:

Rust code
// in `elk/src/main.rs` if let Some(entries) = file.dynamic_table() { for e in entries { println!("{:?}", e); } } for sh in &file.section_headers { println!("{:?}", sh); }
Shell session
$ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/hello-dl (cut) DynamicEntry { tag: SymTab, addr: 00000260 } ^^^^^^^^ (cut) SectionHeader { name: 0000002d, type: 11, flags: 2, addr: 00000260, ^^^^^^^^ off: 00000260, size: 00000030, link: 5, info: 1, addralign: 00000008, entsize: 00000018 }

Great! There's a section header that starts at the same offset! And it has a size field!

We won't spend more time modelling SectionHeader's fields - for example, we don't care about the meaning of flags, link or info. We're just here for addr and size.

So, we were saying... oh, right, delf::File::read_syms. It turns out to be quite similar to read_rela_entries:

Rust code
// in `delf/src/lib.rs` #[derive(Error, Debug)] pub enum ReadSymsError { #[error("SymTab dynamic entry not found")] SymTabNotFound, #[error("SymTab section not found")] SymTabSectionNotFound, #[error("SymTab segment not found")] SymTabSegmentNotFound, #[error("Parsing error")] ParsingError(parse::ErrorKind), } impl File { // Returns the section header that starts at *exactly* this // virtual address, or `None` if we can't find one. pub fn section_starting_at(&self, addr: Addr) -> Option<&SectionHeader> { self.section_headers.iter().find(|sh| sh.addr == addr) } pub fn read_syms(&self) -> Result<Vec<Sym>, ReadSymsError> { use DynamicTag as DT; use ReadSymsError as E; let addr = self.dynamic_entry(DT::SymTab).ok_or(E::SymTabNotFound)?; let section = self .section_starting_at(addr) .ok_or(E::SymTabSectionNotFound)?; let i = self.slice_at(addr).ok_or(E::SymTabSegmentNotFound)?; let n = (section.size.0 / section.entsize.0) as usize; use nom::multi::many_m_n; match many_m_n(n, n, Sym::parse)(i) { Ok((_, syms)) => Ok(syms), Err(nom::Err::Failure(err)) | Err(nom::Err::Error(err)) => { let e = &err.errors[0]; let (_input, error_kind) = e; return Err(E::ParsingError(error_kind.clone())); } // we don't use any "streaming" parsers, so. _ => unreachable!(), } } }

Can we dump symbols now?

Rust code
// in `elk/src/main.rs` let syms = file.read_syms().unwrap(); println!( "Symbol table @ {:?} contains {} entries", file.dynamic_entry(delf::DynamicTag::SymTab).unwrap(), syms.len() ); println!( " {:6}{:12}{:10}{:16}{:16}{:12}{:12}", "Num", "Value", "Size", "Type", "Bind", "Ndx", "Name" ); for (num, s) in syms.iter().enumerate() { println!( " {:6}{:12}{:10}{:16}{:16}{:12}{:12}", format!("{}", num), format!("{:?}", s.value), format!("{:?}", s.size), format!("{:?}", s.r#type), format!("{:?}", s.bind), format!("{:?}", s.shndx), format!("{}", file.get_string(s.name).unwrap_or_default()), ); }
Cool bear's hot tip

The code above is "incredibly wasteful" - well, it would be, if we cared about performance when printing the dynamic symbol table, which we do not.

When you don't care about performance, it's a perfectly fine, quick and dirty way to print values as a table. Emphasis on dirty. And extra emphasis on quick.

Let's try it out:

Shell session
$ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/hello-dl (cut) Symbol table @ 00000260 contains 2 entries Num Value Size Type Bind Ndx Name 0 00000000 0 Some(None) Some(Local) Undef 1 00003000 38 Some(Object) Some(Global) 10 msg ^

Heyyyyy. So there's the symbol our relocations were referring to:

Rela { offset: 00001007, type: Known(_64), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } ^ Rela { offset: 00003000, type: Known(Copy), sym: 1, addend: 00000000 } ^

The 0th entry is all-zeroes, which... (checks ELF-64 reference) is on purpose!

Woohoo.

It also makes sense for msg to be defined in a section of hello-dl, because we're copying it from libmsg.so into hello-dl's heap before startup. (NASM made that decision for us).

So, if we run elk on libmsg.so, then we should.. see msg somewhere as well?

Shell session
$ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/libmsg.so (cut) Symbol table @ 00000160 contains 2 entries Num Value Size Type Bind Ndx Name 0 00000000 0 Some(None) Some(Local) Undef 1 00002000 38 Some(Object) Some(Global) 7 msg

And I suppose it wouldn't be too hard to retrieve its value either?

Rust code
// in `src/elk/main.rs` let msg = syms .iter() .find(|sym| file.get_string(sym.name).unwrap_or_default() == "msg") .expect("should find msg in symbol table"); let msg_slice = file.slice_at(msg.value).expect("should find msg in memory"); let msg_slice = &msg_slice[..msg.size as usize]; println!("msg contents: {:?}", String::from_utf8_lossy(msg_slice));
Shell session
$ cargo b -q $ ./target/debug/elk ./samples/libmsg.so Symbol table @ 00000160 contains 2 entries Num Value Size Type Bind Ndx Name 0 00000000 0 Some(None) Some(Local) Undef 1 00002000 38 Some(Object) Some(Global) 7 msg msg contents: "this is way longer than sixteen bytes\n"

🎉🎉🎉

We've got our work cut out for us.